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Weeding

Weed management is integral for the long jeverdy of your garden Our qualified team is trained to identify weed issues in the garden and provide an ongoing plan to manage the removal and prevention of weed issues on-site.

Part of our service package is to do Quality Control cheeks on your garden to identify weeding and other issues before they become a costly problem.

Below are some Notes that Our team follow to control weeds in the garden include ;

Every square inch of your garden contains weed seeds, but only those in the top inch or two of soil get enough light to trigger germination. Digging and cultivating brings hidden weed seeds to the surface, so assume weed seeds are there ready to erupt, like ants from an upset anthill, every time you open a patch of ground. Dig only when you need to and immediately salve the disturbed spot with plants or mulch. In lawns, minimize soil disturbance by using a sharp knife with a narrow blade to slice through the roots of dandelions and other lawn weeds to sever their feed source rather than digging them out. Keep in mind that weed seeds can remain dormant for a long, long time.

Dig:
If your weeds regrow, then you have a persistent root that you need to dig out. Use a spade or digging fork to dig up persistent weeds by the roots. Remove as many root pieces as you can.

While weeding, hold the trowel vertically (like a child holding a crayon) to eliminate strain on your wrist.

Chop:
If digging out weeds is difficult for you, at least resolve to keep them from setting seed. Chop off their heads once a week!

Minimize Soil Disruption:
Gardeners used to advocate cultivation—stirring the top one or two inches of soil to damage weeds' roots and tops, causing them to die. However, unless you are able to fully remove the roots from the soil, cultivation seems to simply  expose dormant weed seeds to light and air, awakening them. It may be best to preserve the natural soil layers.

Some folks say it helps to turn your soil at night to control weeds. Research indicates that weeds may be stimulated to grow by a sudden flash of light, which is what you give them when you turn the soil over during the day. A German study concluded that by turning the soil at night, weed germination could be reduced by as much as 78 percent. You can try this method by working during a moonlit night, or at dawn or dusk.

Trim:
Keep the edges of your garden mowed; this will help prevent a weed invasion.

Close Ranks:
If your soil is rich and well tilled, plant your plants closer together. This will cut down weed growth.

Start your warm weather plants as soon as you can, to keep the soil from being bare for too long. At the end of the season, plant cover crops such as rye grass, winter wheat, or oats to prevent weeds from finding a home in your garden.

Cut Them Off at the Pass:
Encourage weeds to grow before you plant your garden. Lay sheets of clear plastic over your garden in early spring to warm up the soil and encourage weeds to germinate. Once the weeds are several inches above the soil, pull or hoe them out. Then plant your own crops.

Use Drip Irrigation:
If you can irrigate only the plants that need it, you may avoid the cultivation of weeds in unplanted areas, paths, and areas where they are not welcome.